A very interesting week from Monday 30th May! My first encounter was on my early morning just down to our local fields. I was walking in the field near the river Stour loving the blanket of yellow of the Buttercups when I spotted a Roe buck in the field, all I could see was his head, I tried to take a photo but there was always vegetation in the way, then he looked up straight at me above the flowers I took a picture and I knew it was one of those special moments.

Roe Buck in Buttercups
Roe Buck in Buttercups

It proved to be as it was spotted by an agency on Facebook and contacted me to say that they felt the press may be interested in publicising it. I heard the next day that The Times had published it that day on the 2nd June, I was really pleased and chuffed! I got the message on my phone as I was walking through the same field and I had just seen the buck and a lady friend disappearing into the woods!

Roe buck and doe
Roe buck and doe

After that encounter I then headed to the next field, Netmead as I would a couple of times in the same week and what I saw proved interesting. Things had changed from my previous visits as the field has been cultivated and seeds sown, not sure what until it grows but it meant the dynamic of wildlife had changed. No Herons or Egrets in the field, although I see them flying across the valley. There were of course Gulls, Black-headed gulls and in the second image two different Gulls which I always have trouble identifying so this is the consensus from UK Bird identification Facebook page “Possibly Herring Gull x3 Pink Legs. Definitely the one on the left with light mantle, Lesser Black Backed Gull, Yellow Legs.”

Black-headed Gull
Herring Gulls and Lesser black-backed Gulls
Herring Gulls and Lesser black-backed Gull

There were a few Crows and I would say at least a couple of hundred Rooks from different Rookeries, I would think, every so often a large group took off going in different directions until there were only a few left.

Crow
Crow
Rooks
Rooks

I reached the far corner of the field which looks over the river Stour towards the burial ground and I heard a Cuckoo, it sounded distant but suddenly appeared out of the trees, a very quick picture it moved quite close to me but unfortunately went the other way from a tree so I couldn’t see it. I think there may have been two about as I thought I heard one farther up the North Dorset Trailway.

Cuckoo
Cuckoo

Another welcome sighting was a Yellowhammer, I hadn’t seen one for some time in Netmead field, but this male was posing nicely for me.

Yellowhammer
Yellowhammer

As I walked back I could see some greyish brown birds, there were probably about six of them feeding in the field, I thought Song Thrush until I got my camera lens on them and realised they were Mistle Thrushes. Another pleasing sighting!

Mistle Thrush
Mistle Thrush
Mistle Thrush
Mistle Thrush

Always one or two Pheasants about which Tilly is always interested in!

Pheasant
Pheasant, female

As I walked back up the lane close to home I spotted a Blue Tit coming from a nest in a large Willow, a great nest, it just was just an open crack in the tree. The bird was carrying something in her beak which I can’t make out, not the best of pictures as it was very dark under the trees, it almost looks like a sepal of a flower like Granny Bonnet.

Blue Tit
Blue Tit

My eyes turn to the sides of the hedgerow as I walk up the lane, and this particular morning, 2nd June there was dew on the grass and there was a Dragonfly and Damselflies waiting for their wings to dry in the sun.  I identified the Dragonfly as a Scarce Chaser female and is a Nationally Important Species and near threatened in the UK according to the British Dragonfly Society there were plenty of White Legged Damselflies still roosting like the female below covered in dew.

Scarce Chaser, Female
Scarce Chaser, Female
White Legged Damselfly
White Legged Damselfly

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