After the weekend I decided that I would like to go and see and take some photos of the Rose coloured Starling and perhaps get a little closer. I went back to where he was before and again a small group of people were there, someone had seen him a little earlier so there was a chance we would spot him again. After a little time we were rewarded with a sight of him on a distant bush and for quite some time we could see he moving from bush to hedge and onto the ground so I was able to get some pictures. He wasn’t really close but with my longer focal length lens I was able to get some images that showed the distinctive colouring so I was pleased I went back to see this unusual bird. I kept an eye on the sightings the rest of the week and there was none after the end of the week so I can only assume he moved on.



Rose coloured Starling

The Starling moved farther away so I decided it was time to head back with a little detour to see what else was about, it was getting hot again, so time to go home. I saw a few birds and the Cuckoo was active and I just caught a glimpse of him in the thicket of bushes near the car park.

Yellowhammer, male
Yellowhammer, male
Linnet, male
Linnet, male
Linnet, male
Linnet, male?
Linnet, female
Linnet, female
Stonechat, male
Stonechat, male

There were a few butterflies about but still not in great numbers, I’m hoping when I go back next time there will be more.

Common Blue on Dropwort
Common Blue on Dropwort
Small Tortoiseshell on Hawkbit
Small Tortoiseshell on Hawkbit
Painted Lady
Painted Lady

I came across this flower and bud as I was walking around, the flower was Orchid like and after some research when I got home I found out it was Knapweed Broomrape, a parasitic plant feeding off of the Knapweed flowers that grow on the downs, it is lacking in chlorophyll and very strange looking!

Knapweed Broom Rape
Knapweed Broom Rape
Knapweed Broom Rape
Knapweed Broom Rape

 

4 thoughts on “Martin Down Part 2

  1. Well done on the Rosy. I’m sure your Common Blue is on Dropwort rather than its cousin Meadow Sweet. The former is on drier, calcareous sites, the latter damp areas.

  2. Your photos of the Rosy Starling are terrific, Marilyn, well done! I’d never even heard of it, so that’s a new one for me to remember.

  3. Thank you Claire, only a small number in this country as far as I know so I couldn’t miss the chance of seeing him!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.