Thursday 22nd July and with the likelihood of a warm day I decided to head up to Fontmell Down fairly early to see what Butterflies were about, particularly hoping to see a Chalk Hill Blue. I have never seen one before.

The first wildlife I saw was a Kestrel in the bushes, I’ve seen one in that area of the downs before as I’ve headed over to the Dorset Wildlife reserve a little while from the car park; it must be it’s territory.

Kestrel
Kestrel

I reached the reserve on a steep slope on the down, plenty of wildflowers around so surely plenty of Butterflies? It took a little while before I started spotting them and by the time I made my way back to the car park I had spotted 13 species of the 25 that have been recorded on the down.

  1. Chalk Hill Blue
  2. Brimstone
  3. Dark Green Fritillary
  4. Small Skipper
  5. Peacock
  6. Red Admiral
  7. Large White
  8. Small White or Green Veined White
  9. Marbled White
  10. Small Heath
  11. Clouded Yellow
  12. Meadow Brown
  13. Gatekeeper

I was beginning to give up seeing any blues particularly the Chalk Hill Blue but suddenly a small Butterfly flew past and I watched it until it landed on a flower and sure enough a Chalk Hill Blue, after that I saw a number of them although not in great numbers, difficult to get pictures as they are always busy! A pretty little Butterfly and the ones I saw were males I didn’t see any females, they are not so conspicuous as the males.

Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue
Chalk Hill blue

There were also a few Dark Green Fritillaries.

Dark Green Fritillary
Dark Green Fritillary
Dark Green Fritillary
Dark Green Fritillary
Dark Green Fritillary
Dark Green Fritillary

Also a couple of Marbled White Butterflies. One had a couple of red mites on it’s back called Trombidium breei, not harmful apparently to the Butterfly.

Marbled White and Bumble bee
Marbled White and Bumble bee
Marbled White
Marbled White
Brimstone
Brimstone

I was really pleased to find a Small Heath, they are very small and not easy to spot as they stick low to the ground, their conservation status is high.

Small Heath
Small Heath
Little Skipper
Little Skipper
Little Skipper
Little Skipper

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